1923: nickel and birth-year.

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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Di 25.09.18 18:55

villa66 hat geschrieben: Of the 12,731 Flying Fortresses built, fully 4,750 were combat losses. There were eight or ten men in each one. Remember Richard’s and Granny’s code, too. She used to like telling that story so much, especially the part about his having had a hot dog (aka frankfurter, i.e. Frankfurt) or a cheeseburger (i.e. Hamburg) at the mess hall. I’ve since read, of course, that a lot of families worked out private codes in attempts to evade the WWII censors. And that the censors were very aware of it, too. (65)

v.


1 out of 3 " Fliegende Festungen " lost. That turns things into a perspective. Years ago I read this book by one of the US- airmen who , as your grandmothers uncle wasshot down and survieved : https://www.amazon.de/Die-Feuerreiter-G ... 3813505685
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Di 25.09.18 19:12

villa66 hat geschrieben:I agree...I too think the large size and heavy weight of the new "Casey's Cartwheel" (as it was sometimes called) were the cause of its ultimate failure as a circulation coin.

And I wonder--can't help it, after the 1902j 1-pfennig conversation--if maybe a desire for complete year-sets didm't somehow figure into the 1938 pieces. The 1937 crowns were the only Australian coins dated 1937. The new George VI coinage didn't debut until 1938, so some new crowns of that date would've been needed to complete sets of the new series.

Just a thought.

I like your observation re the Australians and their non-existent half-crown. Strikes me that they may have been decimally-minded early-on.


A complete coinset could be an explanation for a limited crown- issue. Do you know if Australia was in the habit of releasing boxed coinsets, as Britain did ?

Just one more digression from the soldiers pocket- coins. It seems the Dominions where much more eager than the motherland to cast away the predecimal system. This video shows " Decimal Changeover " in South- Africa. Of some interest for our Crown- conversation ; South- Africa converted the fiveshilling- piece into a large 50-cent-piece, but sacked the halfcrown. While the florin carried on as 20-cents, an additional 25- cent- coin was never minted.
The film also shows coins for collectors being put into a case and we can watch a mint- employee inspecting nothing else but the new 50- cents-crown:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EosWw5RfLE8
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mi 26.09.18 10:02

Mynter hat geschrieben:A complete coinset could be an explanation for a limited crown- issue. Do you know if Australia was in the habit of releasing boxed coinsets, as Britain did ?


I don't know. It's been a long time since I read much about Australian coins--I need to catch up some. About the sets, I was thinking mostly about the possibility of privately assembled sets from banks, commemorative associations and other institutional customers.

But I'll look some...and now I go to watch the South African video. Well, sometime tomorrow. Something to look forward to.

:wink: v.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Do 27.09.18 11:17

It's late, so I'll just sketch this. The other night I saw that random post that said a 1M-coin mintage of the 1938 Australian crown had been produced, but only a fraction of it had been released. That info I passed along. But what I did not report--because it seemed too speculative--was a statement that the unissued coins (or their recovered silver) had been sold to China.

Anyway, when I went looking again I learned that the prevailing rumor in the Australian coin hobby is indeed as above, with two additional pieces of detail: 1) the coins (or their metal) were sold to China in 1948, for 2) recoining into Sun Yat-sen dollars.

I ran that through what I knew from my time in the American coin hobby, took my existing notebook entry for this coin....
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Do 27.09.18 11:20

x: China abandoned the silver standard in 1935 and prohibited the circulation of both domestic and foreign silver dollars. On its face, then, this 1934 (year 23) 1-yuan is the last of the Chinese silver dollars intended for circulation, and a survivor of the massive melts that followed their retirement. However...despite its 1934 date, this coin is possibly one of the 30M “1934” 1-yuan coins restruck at the three American mints in 1949 for the purpose of helping Chiang Kai Shek in his war with the Communists. The last American trade dollar! (The 1949 U.S. restrikes of the 1898mo Mexican peso notwithstanding.) (86)

And added this to it...

(This now partially deleted entry was revised and corrected below on 12.11.2018.)

Past time for bed!

:D v.
Zuletzt geändert von villa66 am Mo 12.11.18 10:08, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon KarlAntonMartini » Do 27.09.18 12:29

Thanks for this story! It explains also why the UK stopped minting the British Trade Dollar in 1935. Best regards, KarlAntonMartini
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Do 27.09.18 20:28

Great ! I read this over and over again. I never imagined such a story behind the " Junk dollar " ( and as a consequence the british Traedollar ) !
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Sa 13.10.18 07:34

KarlAntonMartini hat geschrieben:...It explains also why the UK stopped minting the British Trade Dollar in 1935. Best regards, KarlAntonMartini


A belated thanks, guys, for pointing out this connection.

I'm going to recast my Junk dollar note, but two items first...

:) v.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Sa 13.10.18 08:16

Mynter hat geschrieben:...1 out of 3 " Fliegende Festungen " lost. That turns things into a perspective. Years ago I read this book by one of the US- airmen who , as your grandmothers uncle wasshot down and survieved : https://www.amazon.de/Die-Feuerreiter-G ... 3813505685


The cover of this book immediately grabbed my attention--the streaming contrails were a photographer's favorite. Dramatic...sadly beautiful. But I read once that contrails were one of the things bomber crews hated most--it made them much easier to find.

About infantry soldiers, the best book I ever read was the story of a German soldier in WWII whose title in English is The Forgotten Soldier. Guy Sajer was the author, a name I remember because my father and I found ourselves recommending the book to each other one evening, years after each of us had read it.

----------------------------------------

I can't get to the revised Junk dollar entry tonight, but I did have the following ready for a conversation with my Italian friends. The two military cemeteries east of Luxembourg City--German and American--had been mentioned by someone who had seen them as a boy, so I added this from my own boyhood.

First the coin...
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Sa 13.10.18 08:20

x: I pulled this 1967 dieci from circulation myself. It was minted the year Dad let me tag along with him to Rimini. On the way back we stopped for a night in an off-the-beaten-path town called Popoli, and we also visited the German military cemetery at Monte Cassino. I had never been in a place like that and I clearly remember watching Dad for clues on how to behave amongst all the dead “enemies.” I was struck to my heart by Pop’s manner, and his talk, which was exactly as serious and exactly as respectful as if they had been American dead. That, along with my own shock at finding them buried up to seven deep—and so, so many Unknowns—weaned me away from my comic book conception of German soldiers. (67)

v.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon sigistenz » Sa 13.10.18 17:30

villa66 hat geschrieben:About infantry soldiers, the best book I ever read was the story of a German soldier in WWII whose title in English is The Forgotten Soldier. Guy Sajer was the author, a name I remember because my father and I found ourselves recommending the book to each other one evening, years after each of us had read it.

A while ago I read the book, too, in its original (French) version "Le soldat oublié". The French author was born in Paris in 1927. His boyhood fascination of the invading Germans, marching and singing in perfect order led him to join the German army at the age of 15 (!). At the Russian front he realized what it really was about. Understandably the French did not welcome him with open arms when he returned in SS rags from allied POW captivity.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » So 14.10.18 04:26

sigistenz hat geschrieben:...born in Paris in 1927...[and joined] the German army at the age of 15 (!).


I had forgotten how very young he was...

And on the other side of the world, a book called Long the Imperial Way was one of Pop's must-reads. I did finally read some of it--it's a first-person account of a Japanese soldier who fought in China--but I was only recently out of an army myself, and reading about the unbending (and often stupidly cruel) discipline he had endured as a Japanese soldier held little appeal for me.

In fact, what I remember was reading to the part where he said that a Japanese soldier was required to wear his primary masculine component on his left side.

That was enough of Long the Imperial Way for me!

:D v.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mo 12.11.18 10:34

Weddings, it turns out, are real time-takers, even for innocent bystanders. My middle daughter--married last weekend--is now in Miami waiting for the cruise ship that will take her and her new husband to the Bahamas.

Hope for a coin!

The sixpence in her shoe was Victorian, from 1888.

---------------------------------------------------

I finally got around to revising the Junk dollar posts in my coin-notebook. I left them in virtually their final form, and apologize for not having broken them up to make them easier to read. (By convention, I limited entries to 13 lines or less.)

So, China's 1933 and 1934 Junk dollars, which we had originally gotten to because of their possible connection to Australia's 1937-38 crowns, which we had mentioned as frequent souvenirs of American servicemen during WWII....

:) v.
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mo 12.11.18 10:50

x: The new Central Mint of China (in Shanghai) began striking coins early in March, 1933. Those first—and for some time, only coins produced—were the new “Junk” dollars dated Year 21 (1932). But its “rising sun” to the right of the junk was a fatal flaw in a China that the Japanese had begun to dismantle. So manufacture of the 1932-dated dollars ended by July ’33 and all but 51K of the 2.26M produced were melted. A second version of the “Junk” dollar was quickly introduced, likely using silver recovered from the earlier coins, and here it is. This 1933 (Year 22) 1-yuan was redesigned to remove the too-Japanese rising sun, but also the three birds over the junk, which in 1933 China had been interpreted as Japanese warplanes. What remained was an uncluttered reverse that sometimes seems quite elegant, and at other times seems just empty. Always, though, the lack of difficult-to-reproduce detail, and the usual somewhat vague strike, must have made these coins easy targets for counterfeiters. (x)
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Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mo 12.11.18 10:54

x: China abandoned the silver standard in 1935 and prohibited the circulation of both domestic and foreign silver dollars. On its face, then, this 1934 (year 23) 1-yuan is the last of the Chinese silver dollars intended for circulation, and the survivor of a decade of Japanese depredation. But China’s 1934 1-yuan is…complicated. This coin is possibly one of the 30M “1934” Junk dollars restruck at the three American mints in 1949 for the purpose of helping Chiang Kai Shek in his war with the Communists. (The 1949 U.S. restrikes of the 1898mo Mexican peso had the same purpose.) And note that some of these 1934 dollars were likely restruck in China using metal recovered from recycled 1938 Australian crowns. The rumor, it seems, is that the unpopularity of the crown in circulation caused only a small portion of the 1938 mintage to be released, with the remainder being sold to China in 1948 for recoining into Sun Yat-sen (“Junk”) dollars. It makes sense. After the wide-ranging Currency Law of 19 August 1948, silver dollar production was ordered resumed at Shanghai in Spring 1949. The Chinese Nationalists were soon forced to flee, but coined another 5M “1934” dollars during their retreat, at Chengtu, Canton, and Taipei. (x)
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