1923: nickel and birth-year.

Alle Münzen vom Amerikanischen Kontinent

1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mi 12.09.18 09:08

One of the many occasions—great and small—that coins get linked with are birth-years. I got to thinking about Buffalo nickels and birth-years while I was thinking about the “nickel-squeezer” and his son, the WWII infantryman. That, and something I’d read, got me to thinking about 1923 nickels like this one…
Dateianhänge
100_0434.JPG
100_0440.JPG
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mi 12.09.18 09:12

American nickels were kid’s coins through and through, and 1923 nickels like this one worked hard during the ‘20s and ‘30s helping to entertain the kids born that particular year.

But 1923 was an unlucky birth-year for a lot of young men—not only for Americans, but around the world. Buffalo nickels, though, were the coins that American boys were spending when Pearl Harbor was attacked in December, 1941. By New Year’s Day, 1942, the American boys born in 1923 were all 18-year-olds.

It’s a great age, 18. Well, usually. But in wartime? For folks caught up in the shitty arithmetic of total war, 18 can be pretty tough.

Author Phil Nordyke wrote a 2006 book about the paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne called The All Americans in World War II. Something he wrote really stuck in my mind. Right after the close of the war in Europe, in the Spring of 1945, while the troops were still in place, and still unsure whether they would be going to the Pacific to fight more, came this, from an interview—

“Staff sergeant Ross Carter, with Company C, 504th [Parachute Infantry], was one of the very lucky men who served in a rifle company in the 82nd Airborne Division from North Africa to Germany. ‘My friends call me a refugee from the law of averages. My regiment still exists as a name, but the regiment in which I trained, fought, and almost died, now lies buried in obscure army cemeteries in ten countries.’”

The boys born in 1923? The 18-year-olds of 1942? For too many of them, by 1945 it was something like “Now…buried in obscure army cemeteries in ten countries.”

The lucky ones got home, and probably had reason to put a nickel into a payphone to call ahead to their wives, or their folks, or maybe to phone a taxi from the airport, dock, or train station….
Dateianhänge
100_0434.JPG
100_0440.JPG
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mi 12.09.18 09:16

But the unlucky ones? The paratroopers of the 82nd who lay “buried in obscure army cemeteries in ten countries,” what had been in their pockets? What coins of theirs went to Kansas City?

(During WWII Kansas City, Missouri, was the collection point for the personal effects of the American soldiers, sailors and airmen who were killed or missing. Into the middle of the country would come the train-cars, in from the coasts, in from the war in the Pacific, in from the war in Europe.)

The ten countries spoken of by Staff-sergeant Ross Carter of Charlie Company? The possibilities, I think, are these: the U.S., Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Italy (Sicily), Italy (mainland), U.K., France, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany.

So here’s one candidate for the trip through Kansa City, and then home to a family with a Gold Star in their window. An aluminum-bronze 5-franc piece coined in Paris in 1939 for use in Algeria, found in the U.S. and hardly touched. But touched, nevertheless.

v.
Dateianhänge
100_9079.JPG
100_9082.JPG
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Do 13.09.18 16:47

When the US-boys where stationed in the UK in early 1942 , this " Rocking Horse Crown " could have been put aside as a souvenir.
Unfortuanatly I could not find a direct link to the very episode of " Foyles War " (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33XatWuJH70 ) dealing with the arrival of the US- troops in rural Hastings, an entry wich to many a tradition- loving Englishman might have seemed like a " Clash of Cultures ". Anyway, here is a surview of this particular part of one of the greatest detective-dramashows ever :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foyle%27s_War_(series_4)#%22Invasion%22

Rocking horse crown 1935 001 - Kopi.JPG
Rocking horse crown 1935 002 - Kopi.JPG
Rocking horse crown 1935 002 - Kopi.JPG (30.49 KiB) 367-mal betrachtet
Zuletzt geändert von Mynter am Sa 15.09.18 14:20, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
Grüsse, Mynter
Benutzeravatar
Mynter
 
Registriert: Do 03.09.09 23:11
Wohnort: Huttaheiti, Finsterstes Barbaricum

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Sa 15.09.18 08:53

I can't get started on the British and the folks they sometimes called "The Occupying Power;" I won't stop. :D Too much fun. (And not--the number of left-side-driving Britons killed by the right-side-driving Americans in WWII traffic accidents, for example.)

--------------------------------------------------------

The Rocking Horse crown is an inspired choice for the topic here. Here's part of my notebook entry for the '37 crown:

A few years afterward, during the war, these 1937 Coronation crowns (and those of the 1935 Jubilee) were being snapped up by American servicemen at a pound apiece. The London correspondent of The Sydney Morning Herald reported that “American servicemen, inveterate coin collectors, have done much to stimulate interest in England…[and]…American soldiers are sending up values.”

Sending up values? More like driving up prices, which was a common theme in Anglo-American relations at the time.

Good choice!

;) v.
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » So 16.09.18 09:01

Thinking about all this today I finally made a connection (thanks Mynter), and added this to my entry for Australia's 1938 crown:

This particular coin came from a militaria shop. Which made sense, once I remembered the London correspondent of The Sydney Morning Herald had reported that “American servicemen, inveterate coin collectors,” were snapping up modern British crowns at a pound apiece. That news would have been of interest back home, because American servicemen were then flooding into Australia like they were into the U.K. Prices for crowns like this one, I’ll bet, soon went to a pound—if they weren’t there already.

:) v.
Dateianhänge
100_0499.JPG
100_0504.JPG
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » So 16.09.18 17:02

Nice Aussie- Crown.I believe 1938 is the scarcer year?
I am adding the british Coronation Crown. designed for Edward VIII the Coat of Arms- reverse was now realised for George VI who soon should be the voice who gave Britons strength during bleak wardays of sweat and blood :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHY2UzOonig

Crown 1937 001 – Kopi.JPG
Crown 1937 002 – Kopi.JPG
Grüsse, Mynter
Benutzeravatar
Mynter
 
Registriert: Do 03.09.09 23:11
Wohnort: Huttaheiti, Finsterstes Barbaricum

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mo 17.09.18 08:04

Mynter hat geschrieben:Nice Aussie- Crown.I believe 1938 is the scarcer year?



It is a pretty tough coin, that I was really happy to have lucked into. Somewhat controversial too--often criticized for diluting the meaning of the 1937 crown of identical design. (My favorite homegrown theory is that it's a silent commemorative of the 1938 Australian Sesquicentennial--but that's just me talking to myself.)

And "silent commemorative," by the way, is something I learned from you, in our conversations here...thanks.

Anyway, here's the Aussie crown, I'm sure, that most American servicemen came home from the Pacific with, the 1937:

:) v.
Dateianhänge
100_0490.JPG
100_0493.JPG
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon villa66 » Mo 17.09.18 08:11

And please let me backtrack a moment to say your '37 Coronation crown is a beautiful thing. My two Australian crowns, on the other hand, had careless owners somewhere along the way.

:wink: v.
villa66
 
Registriert: Do 15.10.09 14:13

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Di 18.09.18 19:56

villa66 hat geschrieben:And please let me backtrack a moment to say your '37 Coronation crown is a beautiful thing. My two Australian crowns, on the other hand, had careless owners somewhere along the way.

:wink: v.

Thanks. A lucky and modestly priced ebay- find.
Grüsse, Mynter
Benutzeravatar
Mynter
 
Registriert: Do 03.09.09 23:11
Wohnort: Huttaheiti, Finsterstes Barbaricum

Re: 1923: nickel and birth-year.

Beitragvon Mynter » Di 18.09.18 20:00

villa66 hat geschrieben:
Mynter hat geschrieben:Nice Aussie- Crown.I believe 1938 is the scarcer year?



It is a pretty tough coin, that I was really happy to have lucked into. Somewhat controversial too--often criticized for diluting the meaning of the 1937 crown of identical design. (My favorite homegrown theory is that it's a silent commemorative of the 1938 Australian Sesquicentennial--but that's just me talking to myself.)

And "silent commemorative," by the way, is something I learned from you, in our conversations here...thanks.
:) v.

Or perhaps the last batch of the " 1937- Crown- order " was not struck before 1938 and , by a misunderstanding , issued with the date of the actual year, as hapend with the finish Olympia- coin of 1951 ?
Grüsse, Mynter
Benutzeravatar
Mynter
 
Registriert: Do 03.09.09 23:11
Wohnort: Huttaheiti, Finsterstes Barbaricum


Zurück zu Nord- und Südamerika

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 2 Gäste

Mnzen Top 50
.
WEBCounter by GOWEB
Sie lesen gerade: 1923: nickel and birth-year.